The Denver Airport Installs a Talking Gargoyle That Says “Welcome to the Illuminati Headquarters”

By Vigilant Citizen

The Denver International Airport installed a talking animatronic gargoyle that pokes fun at the “Illuminati” conspiracies surrounding the airport. When one understands the true purpose of gargoyles, the “conspiracy” only gets thicker.

The Denver International Airport (DIA) is a creepy place and it keeps getting creepier. If you read my 2008 article Sinister Sites: The Denver Internation Airport, you already know about its demonic horse that killed its creator, its Masonic plate saying “New World Airport Commission” and its horrific murals depicting a genocide.


Ten years later, this mural still thoroughly creeps me out.

All of these bizarre things and more lead to “conspiracies” regarding the airport and its possible secret purpose. What’s up with the bizarre markings on the floor? Why did they build a massive tunnel system underneath the airport? And, of course, why are there gargoyles looking over travelers?


One of two gargoyles overlooking the baggage claim at the DIA.

Instead of providing taxpayers rational explanations about the airport they have to use, the DIA launched recently launched a media campaign poking fun at the conspiracies surrounding the airport. And that campaign was weird.

This year, the DIA decided to take the weirdness to yet another level by installing a talking animatronic gargoyle that surprises travelers with sassy jokes and comments. The airport posted a video on YouTube showcasing this thing that probably cost a whole lot of taxpayer money.


A screenshot of the talking gargoyle video.

In the video the gargoyle says to one passenger:

“Welcome to the Illuminati Headquarters, I mean, Denver International Airport!”

In another hilarious bit, it says:

“Well, I’m 243 years old now”.

If you do the math, that means that the gargoyle was born in 1776. The Bavarian Illuminati was founded in 1776. The video ends with classic Illuminati imagery.


I remember when airports used to focus on, like, planes and stuff.

Judging by the comments on YouTube, most viewers do not appreciate the gargoyle.

The question that is begging to be asked is: WHY? Why is there a creepy, horned demon talking to people who are trying to catch a flight?

A spokesperson of the DIA told Fox News:

“DEN is known for the conspiracies about our airport, and we wanted to find a playful way to embrace the conspiracies. We always strive to win the hearts of our passengers by giving them the unexpected. We hope the gargoyle gave them all a good belly laugh, and more reason to want to travel through DEN.”

As one commentator stated: “If there is one place in the world you don’t want anything unexpected is a place where you get into a crowded tube with jet engines and go way up in the sky”. Furthermore, do airports actually require marketing campaigns? I mean, people go to airports because they have to. There is no airport competition.

In a somewhat bizarre tweet (for an international airport), the DIA claims that the gargoyle celebrates the airport’s 24th anniversary.


That’s not the kind of hashtags you’d want to see from an airport.

That barely makes sense. And why are they celebrating a 24th birthday? That’s not a milestone. More importantly, why a gargoyle?

What’s a Gargoyle?

The actual origin and purpose of gargoyles are somewhat vague and mysterious. However, these “stone demons” tend to appear in highly esoteric places. For instance, the most famous gargoyles in the world are probably those perching at the top of the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris. This famous landmark was built by the Knight Templars (an occult order of the Middle-Ages) and is replete with esoteric symbolism.


One of the gargoyles at the top of the Notre-Dame Cathedral looking over Paris.

While the common explanation of gargoyles is that “they ward off evil”, occult researchers agree that the truth is infinitely deeper.

“The most impressive thing about the art of the gargoyle is that in the medieval world it is possible to similarities in design, if not in style, between forms built as far apart as northern Scotland and southern Spain. The modern loss of the ancient esoteric lore has meant that much of the significance of these fascinating figures is now unrecognized, though there are often strange survivals which are clearly influenced by grimoire litterature, or which have esoteric or magical inscriptions or sigils as, for example, the extraordinary collection on the walls of the parish church in the Lancastrian town of Littleborough.”
– Fred Gettings, Dictionary of Demons

Eliphas Levi, one of the most influential occultists in the Western world, wrote in his famous book Dogme et Rituel de la Haute Magie that gargoyles are one of the many faces of the “terrible emperor of night”.

“We recur once more to that terrible number fifteen, symbolized in the Tarot by a monster throned upon an altar, mitred and horned, having a woman’s breasts and the generative organs of a man – a chimera, a malformed sphinx, a synthesis of deformities. Below this figure we read a frank and simple inscription – THE DEVIL. Yes, we confront here that phantom of all terrors, the dragon of all theogonies, the Ahriman of the Persians, the Typhon of the Egyptians, the Python of the Greeks, the old serpent of the Hebrews, the fantastic monster, the nightmare, the Croquemitaine, the gargoyle, the great beast of the Middle Ages, and – worse than all these – the Baphomet of the Templars, the bearded idol of the alchemist, the obscene deity of Mendes, the goat of the Sabbath. The frontispiece to this “Ritual” reproduces the exact figure of the terrible emperor of night, with all his attributes and all his characters.”

In short, gargoyles perfectly represent occultism. To the profane, these grotesque creatures are mere “decorations”. To the initiates, they represent the dark demonic forces that can be found in the spiritual world – if one knows how to deal with it.

For all of these reasons, installing a gargoyle at the DIA makes perfect sense.